lastrealindians

lastrealindians:

Police officers who shot Indian teen get medals by Brandon Ecoffey

CLINTON, Okla. — Two recipients of the Oklahoma Sheriff’s Association Medal of Honor were also involved in the shooting death of Mah-hi-Vist GoodBlanket. The parents of GoodBlanket feel that both the shooting of their son and the awards given are unjustified.

In December of 2013, the GoodBlankets had called the police to their home after their son Mah-hi-Vist (18) had raised alarm after slipping in to what they have called an Oppositional Defiant Disorder episode.

“We called the police to protect him,” said his mother Melissa. “By the time the police had arrived he had calmed down and was in there with his girlfriend.”

The GoodBlankets were waiting in their car when police deputies first arrived at their home. According to them, two officers entered the home through a broken window and then within seconds exited through the same window. The GoodBlankets say that there was then a second entry that ended with the shooting of Mah-hi-Vist seconds after officers breached the house.

The officers have claimed that Mah-hi-Vist had threatened officers with a knife and that they were forced to shoot him.

The GoodBlankets say that the claims of officers do not reflect what they saw happen from their vantage point in the driveway where they say they could see in to the windows of the home. Custer County Sheriffs had been accompanied by two Oklahoma Highway Patrolmen in the final moments of Mah-hi-Vist’s as he was in the home with his girlfriend. Autopsy reports show that Mah-hi-Vist was shot 7 times, once in the head, and twice by a Taser gun.

“His girlfriend came running out on the yard screaming that they had shot him,” said Melissa GoodBlanket, the mother of Mah-hi-Vist.

Melissa says that the shooting was an example of excessive force and feels that the shooting was unnecessary.

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femfreq
This dominant narrative surrounding the inevitability of female objectification and victimhood is so powerful that it not only defines our concepts of reality but it even sets the parameters for how we think about entirely fictional worlds, even those taking place in the realms of fantasy and science fiction. It’s so normalized that when these elements are critiqued, the knee-jerk response I hear most often is that if these stories did not include the exploitation of women, then the game worlds would feel too “unrealistic” or “not historically accurate”. What does it say about our culture when games routinely bend or break the laws of physics and no one bats an eye? When dragons, ogres and magic are inserted into historically influenced settings without objection. We are perfectly willing to suspend our disbelief when it comes to multiple lives, superpowers, health regeneration and the ability to carry dozens of weapons and items in a massive invisible backpack. But somehow the idea of a world without sexual violence and exploitation is deemed too strange and too bizarre to be believable.
Tropes vs Women in Video Games, Women as Background Decoration: Part 2 (via femfreq)